CCHR

Irish-American Exchange on Human Rights at NDLS

irish-american-flags Notre Dame Law School will host the inaugural “Irish-American Exchange on Human Rights” on campus, October 9-10, 2009. The event will bring together faculty and students from two of the world’s leading institutions of human rights education—the Center for Civil and Human Rights at Notre Dame Law School, and the Irish Centre for Human Rights, National University of Ireland-Galway—for a series of presentations and responses on human rights issues of the day. Read More

Worldview Commentary No. 296 on WBEZ, 91.5, Chicago Public Radio

“Torture: Outlawed in America?”

Does American law now protect us from another Abu Ghraib? If prisoners are once again stripped naked, threatened by snarling dogs, forced to engage in simulated sex, held in contorted positions for hours in near freezing temperatures, deprived of sleep for days on end, held in isolation for months, subjected to mind-altering drugs, and partially drowned by water boarding, will all this be unlawful? Read More

HIV and the Rule of Law

HIV conference news HIV and the Rule of Law: Human Rights at Home and Abroad is an international, interdisciplinary conference co-sponsored by Notre Dame Law School’s Center for Civil and Human Rights, the American Bar Association AIDS Coordinating Committee, the College of Arts and Letters, Eck Institute for Global Health, the Ford Family Program in Human Development Studies and Solidarity, and McGuireWoods LLP. Major funding has been provided by McGuireWoods LLP. Read More

Prof. Carozza and IACHR issue preliminary report on Honduras

carozza Notre Dame Professor of Law Paolo Carozza is back on campus following a week-long fact-finding mission in Honduras. He was there as part of an Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) delegation to observe that nation’s human rights situation following a June 28 military coup that led to the ousting of Honduran President Manuel Zelaya. Read More

Prof. Carozza Returns from Honduran Human Rights Mission

carozza Notre Dame Professor of Law Paolo Carozza returns to campus Monday, Aug. 24 following a week-long fact-finding mission in Honduras to observe the human rights situation there following a June 28 military coup that led to the ousting of Honduran President Manuel Zelaya. Read More

Jessica Brock – CCHR Summer Fellow

Jessica Brock, NDLS ’10, is spending the summer in Kampala, Uganda as an HIV and Human Rights Intern for UNAIDS. Her work has included review of the HIV and AIDS Prevention and Control Bill, drafted by the Uganda Law Reform Commission (ULRC). Read More

Worldview Commentary No. 295 on Chicago Public Radio, 91.5 FM WBEZ

“Earth Day 2009: A Human Right to a Decent Environment?”

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Does international law recognize a human right to a decent environment? Should it?

The question is more complicated than it might seem. The concept of human rights is human-centered. For the law to protect the environment, by declaring it a human right, could be understood to mean that the case for our planet turns on whether it happens to accommodate us. Read More

CCHR Presents Obama Admin’s Record on Human Rights and Terrorism

CCHR Obama HR news As part of its Advisory Committee Meeting, the CCHR will present a panel discussion entitled “The Obama Administration’s Record on Human Rights and Terrorism: The First Sixty Days”. Panelists include Steven M. Watt, senior staff attorney with the ACLU Human Rights Program and graduate of the Center for Civil and Human Rights LL.M. program and Doug Cassel, Director of the Center for Civil and Human Rights. The presentation will begin at 3:00 p.m. and will be held in the Faculty Meeting Room (Room 2130) in the Eck Hall of Law. Read More

Worldview Commentary on Chicago Public Radio, 91.5 FM WBEZ - 2/25/2009

Guatemala: Canadian Mining Company under Scrutiny

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While industries in the global economy continue to struggle, there is one industry, other than oil, that’s having blockbuster profits; it’s the gold mining industry. As waffling financial markets force cautious investors run to precious metals, gold’s value continues to skyrocket. Read More

Worldview Commentary No. 294 on Chicago Public Radio, 91.5 FM WBEZ

“Justice for Cambodia’s Killing Fields?”

Too little, too late, too suspect – but better than nothing, perhaps: the first of five planned trials of former Khmer Rouge leaders is set to begin next week in Phnom Penh, the capital city of Cambodia.

If ever crimes cried out for justice, the Killing Fields of Cambodia are near the top of the list. During a four-year reign of terror three decades ago, Khmer Rouge lunacy led to the deaths of an estimated 1.7 million people — one fifth of Cambodia’s entire population. Two hundred thousand victims were executed. The rest died from starvation and disease. Read More

Peace and Reconciliation in Northern Uganda

Featuring

Archbishop John Baptist Odama

Archdiocese of Gulu, Uganda

Archbishop John Baptist Odama has played a prominent role in promoting peace and reconciliation amidst one of the world’s most gruesome conflicts. He has been instrumental in moving forward the peace process and serves as an official observer in that process. He has been outspoken in proposing indigenous alternatives to war crimes indictments, alternatives that would ensure accountability while promoting reconciliation. He has joined other Christian and Muslim leaders in pursuing these and other peacebuilding activities through the Acholi Religious Leaders Peace Initiative. Read More

Of War and Law

Of War and Law A Symposium and Film Festival on the Occasion of the 60th Anniversary of the Geneva Conventions on the Protection of Victims of Armed Conflict Read More

PEACE BRIGADES INTERNATIONAL: SAVING LIVES AND PROMOTING PEACE

Featuring Katherine Hughes-Fraitekh and Krystal Mason, Peace Brigades International
4:15 pm
Tuesday, January 27
C-103 Hesburgh Center
This lecture will highlight the critical work of Peace Brigades International, especially its efforts in Nepal related to human rights and the country’s transition from monarchy to republic. Read More

Worldview Commentary No. 292 on Chicago Public Radio, 91.5 FM WBEZ

“Corruption: Corroding Democracy, Stifling Economies”

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To judge by public perceptions, the United States is far from the most corrupt country in the world. Of 180 nations rated by Transparency International’s Corruption Perceptions Index for 2008, the US ranks as the 18th least corrupt.
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LLM graduate reelected as Executive Secretary of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights

The Center for Civil and Human Rights congratulates Pablo Saavedra Alessandri, a 1996 Notre Dame LLM graduate, who this week was reelected to a second five-year term as Executive Secretary of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights. According to the Court’s press release, the judges agreed on Saavedra’s reelection base on his outstanding performance during his first term as Executive Secretary, from 2003-2008. Read More

Chilean Judge Guzman and Ambassador Williamson Speak on Friday

On Friday, Nov. 14, Notre Dame Law School’s Center for Civil and Human Rights (CCHR) will host the Hon. Juan Guzman, the retired Chilean judge who became internationally famous for being the first judge to prosecute former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet on human rights charges, and Ambassador Richard Williamson, President Bush’s special envoy to Sudan. Guzman will speak in room 105 of the Law School at 12:10 p.m., and Williamson will speak in room 105 at 2:00 p.m. Read More

Broken Laws, Broken Lives: Medical Evidence of Torture by US Personnel and Its Impact

Farnoosh Hashemian, MPH, lead author of above mentioned Physicians for Human Rights (PHR) report “Broken Laws, Broken Lives: Medical Evidence of Torture by US Personnel and Its Impact” will present her findings. According to PHR, the groundbreaking report presents for the first time medical evidence to confirm first-hand accounts of mend who endured torture by US personnel in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Guantanamo Bay. None of the tortured men were ever charged with a crime. Read More

Worldview Commentary on Chicago Public Radio, 91.5 FM WBEZ - 11/5/2008

Obama Presidency and Human Rights

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Today, Amnesty International urged President-elect Obama to make a clean break with alleged human rights abuses of the Bush Administration. The human rights organization has requested an early meeting with the President-elect to discuss the new administration’s human rights agenda. Read More

Worldview Commentary No. 291 on Chicago Public Radio, 91.5 FM WBEZ

“Venezuela’s Chávez: Expelling Human Rights Watch”

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Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez, who is nothing if not a charmer, has succeeded in seducing many of my friends in the democratic left in Europe and the Americas. His formula is simple: denounce the gringos, embrace the poor, add charisma, and stir. Read More

New Book Features NDLS Faculty

A new book titled “Peace through Commerce: Responsible Corporate Citizenship and the Ideals of the United Nations Global Compact,” includes essays by major business leaders and scholars—including Notre Dame Law School’s Douglass Cassel and Sean O’Brien—who discuss the issues presented by the United Nations Global Compact, including the impact of commerce in promoting peace and the benefits of global economic development through voluntary corporate policies and actions. Read More

CCHR Post-doc Discusses Human Rights in Sudan

On Monday, Sept. 15, Muthee Kiunga, a post-doctoral research associate for Notre Dame Law School’s Center for Civil and Human Rights (CCHR) will present “Beyond Darfur: Conflict and Human Rights in Southern and Eastern Sudan.” The talk begins at 12:15 in room 101 of the Law School. Read More

Professor O’Connell extols international law

The reaction of the United States to the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, particularly the authorization of torture and secret detention, has greatly depleted the power of already strained international institutions, and Mary Ellen O’Connell would like to do something about that.

In her new book, “The Power and Purpose of International Law,” published by Oxford University Press, O’Connell, Robert and Marion Short Professor of Law at Notre Dame, opposes the recently revived arguments about the impotence of international law and its inapplicability to the United States. Read More